Arts and entertainment news | Daily Inter Lake

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Applications open for Artist Wildnerness Connection Applications open Jan. 6 for the artist wilderness connection, artist residency program. Artists from various disciplines, medias and styles are invited to apply to the 2023 Artist Wilderness Connection, a unique collaborative artist-in-residence program in Montana managed by Hockaday Museum of Art, Flathead National […]


Applications open for Artist Wildnerness Connection

Applications open Jan. 6 for the artist wilderness connection, artist residency program.

Artists from various disciplines, medias and styles are invited to apply to the 2023 Artist Wilderness Connection, a unique collaborative artist-in-residence program in Montana managed by Hockaday Museum of Art, Flathead National Forest, Bob Marshall Wilderness Foundation, and Swan Valley Connections, now in its 19th year.

Applications open online tomorrow and close Feb. 17. Individuals and group collaborations from all artistic styles and mediums are invited to apply. The online application and full program information is available at www.hockadaymuseum.com/artist-wilderness. Selected artists will be announced on March 17.

The 2023 Artist Wilderness Connection program will select two artists, writers, or musicians to stay in remote forest cabins in the Bob Marshall and Great Bear Wilderness Areas of Northwest Montana for one to two weeks during the months of July, August or September while creating art inspired by nature and their wilderness living experience.

After completing their residency, artists will work with the Hockaday Museum of Art and other program partners to share their backcountry experience with a free community outreach program or exhibition and donate a representative artwork to the Artist Wilderness Connection program.

For more information about the program or application process, contact Kathy Martin at the Hockaday Museum of Art, 406-755-5268, [email protected]; Teresa Wenum at the Flathead National Forest, 406-758-5218 or Rebecca Powell at the Bob Marshall Wilderness Foundation, 406-387-3808.

Metropolitan Opera Live in HD: Fedora

Whitefish Theatre Company and the Whitefish Performing Arts Center are co-presenting the fourth live on-screen performance of the Metropolitan Opera Live in HD 2022 to 2023 season. Umberto Giordano’s exhilarating production of “Fedora” will be shown on Saturday, Jan. 14 at 10:55 a.m. at the Whitefish Performing Arts Center.

Fedora returns to the Met for the first time in 25 years. Fedora Romanzov, a Russian princess, tracks down Count Loris, the murderer of her fiancé. However, in true opera form, she falls in love with him, only to ultimately end her life after she mistakenly betrays him and he denounces her. The Italian hyper-romantic Fedora is packed with memorable melodies, showstopping arias, and explosive confrontations.

Tickets are $20 adults and $10 students, cash only and only sold at the door.

Father-Daughter Winter Ball

Tickets are currently on sale for Whitefish Theatre Co.’s (WTC) 8th-annual Father-Daughter Winter Ball. A wonderful gift idea to give the Dad and daughter (or daughters) for the holidays.

This special evening takes place on Jan. 27 from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at the O’Shaughnessy Center in Whitefish and is open to fathers and daughters of all ages. Come enjoy an evening of elegance, special dances, and memories daughters won’t forget.

Winter motor fun at Miracle of America Museum

From 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday, Jan. 14, during the museum’s second Winter Fest, visitors to the Miracle of America Museum can learn more about (and ride on) selected early snow transportation machines.

About 100 years ago, folks rigged bicycles with runners in the front and studded tires in the back to carry them through the snow. When the internal combustion engine came along, winter-loving innovators developed machines for use on the snow. By the 1920s, the first machines we now call snowmobiles were on the scene. Compared to today’s sleek and powerful models, these early machines were much slower, often clumsy and often harder to maneuver — yet they opened up winter recreation to a new audience.

Machines that are usually part of static exhibits will come to life as museum volunteers start the engines and offer rides and demonstrations of historic snow machines and other snow vehicles.

In addition, visitors will be able to take a ride on two vintage vehicles used in Glacier National Park, the sno-crawler built by members of the maintenance crew in their East Glacier shop and the historic 1952 Tucker Sno-cat which replaced it. Participants from the Western Montana Vintage Snowmobile Enthusiasts will also be bringing sleds and giving rides.

The day will be a fundraiser for the nonprofit museum with standard admission prices in effect, plus hot chocolate and apple cider sold for $1 per cup.

Donations will be accepted to cover the cost of the non-ethanol premium gas needed for all historic vehicles. While the emphasis might be on snow machines, visitors are invited to view exhibits containing vintage and historic skis, snowshoes and clothing used during Montana winters.

Museum founder Gil Mangels is also looking for volunteers to drive some of the vehicles and would like to invite any snow sports groups and businesses who would like to demonstrate or display their products during the event to join in the fun.

For more information call 406-883-6804.

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